What We're Reading
September 2017 | RESOLVE Global Forum 2017

In preparation for RESOLVE's Global Annual Forum on September 27, 2017, the RESOLVE Network team’s “What We’re Reading” post for September features key publications related to each of our Forum panels.  

The Forum will feature preeminent international scholars and experts from across the Network’s 20-plus partner organizations around the world. In addition to offering opportunities to connect with leading thinkers, practitioners and policymakers involved in developing responses to violent extremism, the day of panels and roundtable discussions will highlight findings from a year-long study on the rise of violent extremism in Bangladesh and preview upcoming research on the politics of religion in the Lake Chad Basin region.

Panelists will address questions including what do we know about how and when terrorists decide to enter and exit violence, and how do the politics of religion, migration, and identity factor into efforts to counter violent extremism?

 

Click on the links below to view the documents and register for the Forum today!

Follow the conversation on Twitter at #RESOLVEForum.

The New Sectarianism: The Arab Uprisings and the Rebirth of the Shi’a-Sunni Divide
In today’s Arab world, all politics is local. This paper examines the rise of the new sectarianism within the Arab world, specifically looking at Bahrain, Lebanon and Iran, and offers k...
Rethinking Counterterrorism in the Age of ISIS
Failing states are havens for terrorism. A toxic combination of social, economic, and political crises attract violent extremist groups to establish bases in these lawless areas. As the g...
Anatomy of Terror: From the Death of Bin Laden to the Rise of the Islamic State
A compelling, definitive account of how and why bin Laden’s ideology keeps rising from the dead. In early 2011, the heart of the Muslim world roiled in protest, consumed with the uph...
Returning Foreign Fighters and the Reintegration Imperative
Various countries, especially in the Balkans and North Africa, now face the challenge of managing the return of their citizens who have fought in the Iraq and Syria conflicts. As of early...
From Cubs to Lions: A Six Stage Model of Child Socialization into the Islamic State
Using the Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) as a case study, we explore the process by which children evolve from novice recruits to fully fledged members of a violent extremist mo...
Turning to Political Violence: The Emergence of Terrorism
What motivates those who commit violence in the name of political beliefs? Terrorism today is not solely the preserve of Islam, nor is it a new phenomenon. It emerges from social processe...
Molenbeek and Violent Radicalization: ‘A Social Mapping'
This report summarises the findings of a nine-month long investigation by the European Institute of Peace (EIP) into the social structures and the root causes of violent radicalisation wi...
National Dialogue and Social Contract
This brief summarizes the findings of the third working group on Counter-Violent Extremism (CVE), which deliberated upon the need for holding national dialogue(s) to address critical po...
Women, Gender and Daesh Radicalisation.
In this article, Elizabeth Pearson and Emily Winterbotham explore the role of gender in radicalisation to Daesh (also known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, ISIS). They discuss pos...
Foreign Fighters of ISIS and Their Security Threat: The Experience of Turkey
The current insecurity spiral in the Middle East has unleashed multiple security threats all over the region. The lack of governance created by conflicts especially in Syria and Iraq stan...
Iraq after ISIL: An Analysis of Local, Hybrid, and Sub-State Security Forces
Regional or community forces, militias, and other forms of local security actors have long existed in Iraq. However, when the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) took ov...
The Most Dangerous Place: Pakistan's Lawless Frontier
The tribal region located on the frontier between Pakistan and Afghanistan is the centre of terrorist activity in the world today. Since 2001, Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters have regrouped...
Southern Libya Destabilized: The Case of Ubari
From late 2014 to early 2016—in the security and governance vacuum that has characterized Libya since its 2011 revolution— a conflict raged between the indigenous Tuareg and Tubu trib...
How Ethnic and Religious Discrimination Drive Violent Extremism
The rights to equal protection and treatment before the law, without distinction as to religion or ethnicity are universally accepted human rights. States occasionally violate these right...
Journey to Extremism in Africa: Drivers, Incentives and the Tipping Point for Recruitment
The report presents the results of a two-year UNDP Africa study aimed to generate improved understanding about the incentives and drivers of violent extremism, as expressed by recruits to...
What Makes Boko Haram Run?
Boko Haram, a radical jihadi movement that seeks to destroy the secular Nigerian state and its market-based economy, is no closer to its stated goal of establishing God’s kingdom on ear...
Nigeria’s Pernicious Drivers of Ethno-Religious Conflict
Nigeria’s statutory framework grants local officials the authority to extend or deny basic rights to citizens in their jurisdictions, thereby creating incentives for the politicization ...
The Wave of Jihadist Insurgency in West Africa: Global Ideology, Local Context, Individual Motivations
The recent rise of jihadist movements in West Africa, including Boko Haram in the Lake Chad region and Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and its affiliates in the Sahel-Saharan region, has ...