Human Development Network
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2005 Philippine Human Development Report: Peace, Human Security and Human Development in the Philippines

Human Development Network

Abstract

In this 5th issue of the Philippine Human Development Report, the Human Development Network (HDN) breaks out from its comfort zone of basic economic issues and addresses one that is at core a political one: ideology-based armed conflicts. The theme was motivated by the observation that some of the most conflict-ridden provinces are also among the bottom-10 provinces for almost every dimension of human development, yet the link between human insecurity and human development had yet to be explored; that the Philippines is home to two of the world’s longest-running armed conflicts, yet a credible accounting of their human and economic costs is not available; and that insurgency, indeed terrorism, is often casually attributed to income poverty and inequality, yet too many counter examples (of poor communities not participating, much less condoning violence) could be cited. Why, after so many years of counterinsurgency policies and anti-poverty strategies, have resolutions to the conflicts been so elusive? The Report examines the causes and costs of the communist and Moro insurgencies, asks why and how government “counterinsurgency” policies and other institutions have fallen short, and tries to suggest how current peace efforts can be recast or reinforced.