What We're Reading

January 2021 | Identity, Rituals, and Narratives: Lessons from Reentry and Reintegration after Genocide in Rwanda

This month, RESOLVE highlights recommended readings from the RESOLVE Policy Note, "Identity, Rituals, and Narratives: Lessons from Reentry and Reintegration after Genocide in Rwanda." In this note, author Hollie Nyseth Brehm outlines core findings from a case study of the experiences of approximately 200 Rwandans as they left prison or community service camp and returned to their communities. She focuses on identity, rituals, and narratives with an emphasis on initial reentry, which sets the stage for broader reintegration. The publications in this What We’re Reading were suggested by the author to offer a more in-depth look at labeling, narratives and rituals, reintegrative shaming, and the case of Rwanda.  

Publication
Jón Gunnar Bernburg
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2019-11-01
Labeling theory provides a distinctively sociological approach that focuses on the role of social labeling in the development of crime and deviance.
Publication
Ted Chiricos, Kelle Barrick, William Bales, Stephanie Bontrager
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2007-09-01
Florida law allows judges to withhold adjudication of guilt for individuals who have been found guilty of a felony and are being sentenced to probation. Such individuals lose no civil rig...
Publication
Shadd Maruna
|
2011-01-01
Mary Douglas argues that "There are some things we cannot experience without ritual." Ex-prisoner reintegration may be one of them. The punishment process involves an inordinate amount of...
Publication
John Braithwaite
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2003-11-01
The pivotal concept of the Theory in Crime, Shame and Reintegration is reintegrative shaming. According to the theory, societies have lower crime rates if they communicate shame about cri...
Publication
Lee Ann Fujii
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2009-02-01
In the horrific events of the mid-1990s in Rwanda, tens of thousands of Hutu killed their Tutsi friends, neighbors, even family members. That ghastly violence has overshadowed a fact almo...
Publication
Helen M. Hintjens
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1999-06-01
Any adequate account of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda must acknowledge manipulation by external forces, domestic pressures, and psychological factors. Even so, the nature of the Rwandan sta...