What We're Reading

March 2022 | Hopes and Hurdles for Indonesia’s National Action Plan to Prevent Violent Extremism

This month, RESOLVE highlights recommended readings from our Policy Note, Hopes and Hurdles for Indonesia’s National Action Plan to Prevent Violent Extremism. Authors Cameron Sumpter and Yuslikha K. Wardhani outline the key details of Indonesia’s National Action Plan for PCVE before discussing the evident challenges and opportunities moving forward.  This What We’re Reading digest was recommended by the authors to give background on terrorist networks in Indonesia, on radicalization in Indonesia, and on repatriating Indonesian citizens.

On terrorists networks in Indonesia

Jones, Sidney. “Has the Taliban’s victory heightened the terrorism threat in Southeast Asia?.” Australian Strategic Policy Institute, September 23, 2021. https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/has-the-talibans-victory-heightened-the-terrorism-threat-in-southeast-asia/.

Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict. “The Decline of ISIS in Indonesia and the Emergence of New Cells.” IPAC Report No. 66, January 21, 2021. http://www.understandingconflict.org/en/conflict/read/98/

The-Decline-of-ISIS-in-Indonesia-and-The-Emergence-of-New-Cells.Temby, Quinton. Terrorism in Indonesia after ‘Islamic State.’ Singapore: ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute, 2020. https://www.iseas.edu.sg/articles-commentaries/trends-in-southeast-asia/trends-in-southeast-asia-2020/terrorism-in-indonesia-after-islamic-state-by-quinton-temby/.

On radicalization in Indonesia

Schulze, Kirsten E., and Joseph Chinyong Liow. “Making Jihadis, Waging Jihad: Transnational and Local Dimensions of the ISIS Phenomenon in Indonesia and Malaysia.” Asian Security 15, no. 2 (2019): 122-139. https://doi.org/10.1080/14799855.2018.1424710.

Hwang, Julie Chernov. “Why They Join: Pathways into Indonesian Jihadist Organizations.” Terrorism and Political Violence 30, no. 6 (2018): 911-932. https://doi.org/10.1080/09546553.2018.1481309.

Schulze, Kristen E., and Julie Chernov Hwang. “Militant Islam in Southeast Asia: New Insights into Jihad inIndonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines.” Contemporary Southeast Asia 41, no. 1 (2019): 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1355/cs41-1a.

Nuraniyah, Nava. “Not Just Brainwashed: Understanding the Radicalization of Indonesian Female Supporters of the Islamic State.” Terrorism and Political Violence 30, no. 6 (2018): 890-910. https://doi.org/10.1080/09546553.2018.1481269.

On repatriating Indonesian citizens

Ayu Kartika, Dyah. “Extricating Indonesian children from ISIS influence abroad.” New Mandala , August 25, 2021. https://www.newmandala.org/extricating-indonesian-children-from-isis-influence-abroad/.

Anindya, Chaula Rininta. “The Deradicalisation Programme for Indonesian Deportees: A Vacuum in Coordination.” Journal for Deradicalization 18 (Spring 2019). https://journals.sfu.ca/jd/index.php/jd/article/view/195.

Insitute for Policy Analysis of Conflict. “Managing Indonesia’s Pro-ISIS Deportees.” IPAC Report No. 47, July 17, 2018http://www.understandingconflict.org/en/conflict/read/78/
Managing-Indonesias-Pro-ISIS-Deportees.